What’s the Problem Represented to Be? Autism, School and Policy Musing

Filed Under (Government Services, Human Rights, Inclusion, Institutionalization, Policy, school, Single Parenthood) by Estee on 22-04-2015

As Adam school closes, we have our Plan B which does involve his acceptance into a high school language arts community in a school devoted to social justice. Adam is in grade seven but will jump a grade. Some might say this is Ironic, no, for a child who some therapists said couldn’t understand, let alone speak fluently? But it won’t all be in school. In thinking about the schools, policies and systems that are currently in place for autistic people in Canada, I came across the following:

“Heidegger says we are accustomed to having conditions given so that we can plan out definite results. We are used to being able to plan, to calculate, and when we cannot do so, we feel out of our depth…” I fell onto this while reading “Our Dissertations, Ourselves” (2014) but it has another meaning for me. I have promised Adam (and myself) that I would never put Adam into an institutionalized setting/school or group home. The IBI program that I strongly critique is anchored in calculations and definite results or outcomes, even when they are built on false promises because of false assumptions/premises. We want to depend on others to much of this for us… to solve a “problem.” In this, I like what Carol Bacchi asks “What is the problem represented to be?”

This is the core of how systems and autism policies are built.

I think of it this way, we really shouldn’t launch into parent-hood without recognizing that no matter who the child will be, there will be challenges, systemic and otherwise. The neoliberal system also in which we all live works against children by suggesting that everyone can work (and this is also disguised as fulfillment and leisure which often creates a tension with domestic work). I admit I resent this tension. Parenthood requires all of me. It requires that I work outside of existing conditions neither serve Adam nor our values. It is not easy to work outside of systems, or meander in and out of them as we see fit. But right now, we feel it’s necessary.

Reference:

Christine Sorrell Dinkins and Jeanne Merkle Sorrell (2014), Our Dissertations, Ourselves: Shared Stories of Women’s Dissertation Journeys. Palgrave Macmillan

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About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.