Tomorrow is Convocation Day

Filed Under (Academia, Accessibility) by Estee on 15-10-2013

Tomorrow is convocation day for my Master of Arts in Critical Disability Studies in the department of Health Policy and Development at York University. It feels like a whirlwind as I had just finished my MRP and then launched into my first-year PhD study. I’m simply taking a moment to breathe before I teach my next class, wanting to think (and later write) how I ended up here. I had dreams of Adam being at my ceremony, but I checked out the schedule and it will be unbearably long for him. Instead, I ordered the video and we will watch it together. I still wonder what I can do for Adam, as a person with a disability; with the autism label. I have worked because in the end, I still hope. I hope for positive changes that will enable him, nay PERMIT him, to be in the world – be accepted in the world, as an autistic person. I don’t feel at all this convocation is about me, although I worked hard. I don’t think the convocation is an accessible event. In cases like ours, I wish Adam would be allowed to make noises, allowed to come up on the stage with me to accept the degree. Disability is still not as accepted in academia, in ceremony, as I would like it to be; as I hoped and envisioned. By stating that, I inch my way forward, in hope of change. And I use this meagre platform to say it again – that I did it for Adam and he in fact has earned it along with me. My next photo will be of Adam holding that degree with me. No achievement is accomplished alone.

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About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.