The Co-Production of Autism in the film Wretches and Jabberers

Filed Under (autism, Autism History, Communication, Critical Disability Studies, Critical Disability Theory, Film, Language) by Estee on 30-09-2013

Well, I finally posted my Master’s Research Paper that I completed in August and defended in September. You can read it here. Much more work will be going into this as I now pursue my PhD in Critical Disability Studies. I have to say, that a 65-page limit on this topic was extremely challenging. I look forward, as well, to presenting on October 12th in Denver at the Autism National Committee (AutCOM) conference.

Thesis, Birds and Naoki Higashida

Filed Under (Acceptance, Book Reviews, Inspiration) by Estee on 07-09-2013

I successfully defended my thesis on the film Wretches & Jabberers this week, a day before a bird-deluge on Adam. (I’ll post this thesis to my website later this week). It is my hope that we can all promote this self-advocacy film to be the new film people talk about autism (rather than Rain Main). The day before my defense, Adam got bird-pooped on by a rather big bird. He was not happy about it, but I kept explaining that despite it being messy and a damper on his recess time, it meant he was going to have lots of good luck! It seemed to work; Adam smiled in the car all the way home as I heralded my enthusiasm about bird-poop-fortune.

But today I really want to point to something I am very happy about: a review of Naoki Higashida’s book (he is the film subject in Wretches & Jabberers who lives in Japan) in our very own Globe & Mail today – arts section, page R.4. It would be wonderful to keep talking about this and the film and the contributions that non-verbal autistic self-advocates make to our understanding about autism. I hope this review will also lead people to watch the film.

Back to School 2013

Filed Under (Acceptance, Adam, Communication, Identity, Joy, Love, school) by Estee on 03-09-2013

It was back-to-school day. Adam started his new inclusive school today. It was not unfamiliar; he had been there two years ago. He had a great day and was typing very well. Adam was happy when I picked him up and was apparently glad to be back with the big kids at lunch and recess. In the meantime, I’m up to planning the rest of his programs, and my own. I am due to defend my thesis this Thursday and if all goes well, will start my doctorate and teaching assignment next week.

As I opened Adam’s bag this evening I got a new kind of homework that I was most delighted to find – I was asked to tell the teacher about Adam. I was asked to write in a circle about what Adam likes to do as well as answer questions such as: Who is he? What does he mean to you? What are the things about him that I should know? I was just thinking again the other day how, just because are kids have this label we name autism, that our children inherit an identity that does not belong to them. I mean, how often are we asked to talk about our children in positive ways (for lack of a better word)? Aren’t we typically asked by therapists what our kids like for the sake of using them as reinforcement as opposed to knowing who our children are? And what about knowing our children as people first? In thinking about the year ahead, I’ve spent much time over the summer pondering all the things that Adam is, what he loves, what he is good at, and what he brings to his family and to the world. Then surprise! I got this “homework” in his backpack today. Needless to say, all that thinking about what Adam is, as opposed to what he isn’t, helped me to fill the circle quickly. I’m so glad someone else sees the value of this too.

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About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.