“We Are A Critical Mass of Wretches” – Larry Bissonnette

Filed Under (Acceptance, Adam, Communication, Computing/iPad, Development, Inspiration, Joy, Uncategorized, Writing) by Estee on 16-07-2013

I am blissfully tired after our second day at the Communication Institute in Syracuse. This is Adam’s first autism conference and all that stuff that was happening beforehand has abated. He is happy here and spending time in a workshop in the mornings learning more skills, and sitting in talks for the rest of the day, and taking small excursions for his breaks. He has watched other typists here intensively and this always inspires him to do it. I’ve learned that he needs less support than I had been giving him, given the right tools, keyguards, anti-glare screens… I’m learning about iPad apps that will change his life and change the way we “do” school…not that most schools (most using ABA/IBI for autistic kids) in Canada understand or provide as of yet. Adam can’t be normalized but he is a very bright, very autistic, very wonderful and intelligent person.

One thing that really gets my goat, however, is the notion that there is no real purpose in teaching autistic people how to type, use AAC, or engage in an academic curriculum. It blows my mind that these things are under threat for autistic people – that communication tools risk being taken away in favor of verbal behavior, which, of course, harkens back to Oralism – when the deaf culture were denied sign language and were forced to speak and act in normative ways. We can look at Victor of Aveyron (1788-1828) for this under the tutelage of early behaviorist Dr. Itard who later abandoned Victor (although Victor could read and use text). Alexander Graham Bell also favored Oralism and it existed well into the 20th century. Today autistics face a kind-of Oralism in Verbal Behavior programs. It’s not that we don’t want our kids to speak if they can, but most autistic folks can’t speak for a full day or not at all and need other reliable sources of communication. These tools for autistic people are a right as sign language is for the deaf, and considering we are asking autistic people to communicate normatively, and autistic people say that they need this means to articulate their thoughts, it’s a complete mistake to even think of taking this away from people.

Society, in the general sense, doesn’t find that many autistic folks are economically productive enough to invest in them, so instead they are called the burdens on society. I’d like to invert that notion of what a burden it is for all of us to be underestimated and only be taught for the purposes of being the cog in a corporate wheel. May I suggest that we all be creative in thinking about the various kinds of purpose and contribution that humans can make, and rethink “productivity.” Then, I’d like to suggest that parents of autistic children who want their children to be accommodated, educated and literate as autistic people to adopt the mantra of those who doubt our children, “so what?” In other words, I think we need to develop a sense of entitlement when it comes to supporting autistic rights to communication tools, access and accommodations. We have to say “so what?” to being autistic, or our children being autistic. It’s a material reality that normative culture is a majority culture to which autistic people work so hard to adapt, and I think of the terrible injustice it is that autistic people have to prove their value and competence every single day of their lives (and often get held back because of it). I think the mantra “So what?” helps me to keep going against ignorance when people ask me why bother educating Adam as opposed to remediating him (before the right to participate or inclusion) or just teaching him functional skills. We are here, literally, among the “wretches,” and there are quite a few here, folks. The critical mass is growing and we ain’t no epidemic. I don’t care what you think of Adam and his going to school or later, university. Just don’t take away his right to it. As for the wretches, they are doing a magnificent job in advocating for this right, and we have an obligation to support them.

Now I will turn my post back to Adam. He was proud of this little story he wrote today which was read aloud to the class – I can’t remember when a teacher presented Adam’s work to the class for such a long time now:

“One day two leaves fell early in the morning. They weren’t happy because they wanted to stay up on the beautiful branch. A nice boy called Adam found them and stuck them up for the rest of the day.”

A few minutes later he typed to me: “Real useful ideas.” Then, “The joy love you mom.”

Thank you my little one. I am your devoted wretch-in-arms.

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About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.