Happy OM

Filed Under (Ableism, Acceptance, Adam, Autism and Learning, Development, Joy, school) by Estee on 21-06-2012

Should I be looking over my shoulder? As autism mom and son are confronted with many obstacles, feeling settled seems like something that will be stolen from us at any moment. Nevertheless, I’m going to write about how happy I feel today because I recollect the difficult June we had last year when Adam’s former school shut down his class. They tried to place him elsewhere after we were given notice, but it didn’t work out. We scrambled to find Adam a new school, and that school is an ABA school. I fretted, of course. While we’ve always done some ABA alongside play-based and other programs that were very effective in Adam’s early years, we had good and not-so-good experiences. I learned that no matter what form of “therapy,” you decide to use for your child, it can all go south if people believe autism can be cured, or that autism is something that is an unfortunate act of nature (or whatever). Adam is a person-first and there is a fine line between nurturing the person — their strengths and challenges — versus viewing autism as just a “problem” that should be fixed at any cost.

I realized during a camp meeting today that it is a year later since the difficulties of the last one. After working with the head of Adam’s school, I feel we’ve got a pretty good thing going. We’ve worked together and with Adam’s excellent team which has been quilted together over the past decade. I am able to provide a lot of input, and Adam’s team go into the school to contribute to his typed communication, and other needs. Along with the structure that his type of school can provide, this is what makes it work for us because we can bring in the academic programs that Adam also needs and they are customized. We cobble our program together.

Adam seems more relaxed, cooperative, happier, and it feels like he’s getting ready to spread his wings a bit farther. Every day, Adam takes his own iPad pictures and sends me an indepedently written recount of his day. I get this by email. I sometimes send pictures to the school of things they don’t know anything about, and Adam recounts his weekend activities, for instance, on his own. They are still short sentences, and some days they are more detailed than others, but they are his. He has moved beyond sight-reading to phonetic reading and spelling, and this is pretty huge. He approaches his peers and wants to play with them in the way he never has before. He doesn’t know how yet to ask “play with me,” but it’s the first time he consistently wants to be with other kids, and not just the adults. We have our mini-conversations on our way home from school in the car, and on some days, he sustains his eye contact and talks to me with such engagement and intention that he commands mine. He still struggles with spoken language, but he speaks a lot more now and it always improves, although he is inconsistent. I know this sounds confusing, but Adam is complex. He says some pretty neat and funny stuff too, attesting to his sense of humour. It’s amazing what the man of few words is able to communicate and make us understand.

Today at the camp meeting — an inclusive camp — it was pure pleasure seeing everyone so excited to see Adam again. This is a camp that really cares about accommodating him and communicates well with us. I thanked my lucky stars to have such a wonderful group of people helping us out every single day as I sat around the table. For all the mountains I feel we climb, I just want to savour this. I want to thank all the fabulous people who make this happen for Adam which seems like a stark contrast to what the public system will offer us. In such good moments, I feel I must remind myself of how important it is to change the way we approach public education for autistic children. It is so disappointing how the system wants to cut back Educational Assistants here in Toronto, and Special Ed, and inclusion seems a priviledge for the verbal and “well-behaved.” The system is sick, not autistic children. I keep wondering why the cut-backs here, and have to assume (lest I use a less polite word) it’s because of the “cost,” and the doubt that autistic people can contribute or be of any value to society– a ratio that tips the economic scales against us. It seems to boil down to that.

To close, I end with a more optimistic tone — how the camp head revealed that many counsellors asked to work with Adam this year. Apparently, so many people at camp always want to come over and say hello to Adam that they have to ask them to hold off in order that Adam can get on with what he’s doing. He’s like a “camp celebrity” (their words, not mine). Here’s a kid who can’t speak fluently and who has many challenges; a child for whom standardized tests do not serve, and the public system underestimates.

This morning, Adam was chanting “Happy OM,” before he left for school, and I for the camp meeting. I didn’t know it was prophetic about the day so far. I hope for other positive signs.

Happy OM…happy OM….happy OMMMM.

Comments:

Post a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

ads
ads
ads
ads

About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.