The Adam “Rating Scale”

Filed Under (Autism and Intelligence, Autism and Learning, Autism Spectrum and Diagnosis, Behaviours, Communication, Development) by Estee on 16-04-2012

I’m in the process of completing forms. Adam was diagnosed with autism at eighteen months of age. Now that he’s ten, I’ve been re-reading files and reports from clinicians and teachers over the years. We’ve never had a formal IEP because he’s not in public school. Instead, I’m creating a comprehensive history of Adam. I’m also making it current, adding samples of his work along with new reports. I’m calling it Adam’s Ability Binder. It not only will list Adam’s challenges, but will focus more on his abilities as a means to serving him well. Ideally, it will address his ability and disparity of skills — where he is advanced and where his disability makes life more challenging. When it is done, I’m going to find a way to ask Adam what he likes the most and add that to the binder. Right now, I’m combing through years of typed conversations to include and add to this list.

My intention is that it becomes Adam’s living document that goes with him, and to which he can contribute as he grows older. We have no system which understands autism comprehensively, let alone the nuance of every autistic individual. I am trying to create that for Adam and I’m trying to work within the system we have.

I’ve been going through these “Autism Rating Scales” again. They took me three hours to complete. In some of the line I couldn’t stop myself from writing “that is a silly question.” Or “this is a biased question,” when refering to whether my child does “strange things.” I don’t think the things Adam does are “strange.” I know him to be a normal autistic person, for lack of better terminology.

Here were but some of my pet peeves about the questions:

How can we tell if a child is “laughing inappropriately” if they cannot tell us why they are laughing? Laughing and giggling can also be a sign of stress. What if a child’s autism doesn’t let them respond consistently? Adam can sometimes draw with great focus and other times he can barely seem to hold a crayon. Sometimes he speaks full sentences and other times he can’t utter a word. Talking about “shared interests” comes with great patience from a skilled communication partner, and Adam may reveal it verbally or typing, but not yet all of the time.

When completing the Vineland-II, BASC-2, GARS-2, ARS, or Conners 3, it’s so easy for me to notice what’s missing from these “scales.” I sigh and mumble through them, and realize I’ve got my own summaries to add. Many of the questions are also about friends. Adam seems aware of his difference, and I’ve learned this when he has typed about it. I also know Adam to avoid situations where he is aware of his difference or think he might fail. I’ve seen Adam approach a group of children to join in, then stops and waits on the sidelines because he doesn’t know how to “get in.” Recently when another child expressed pity towards him because he is autistic, Adam stopped jumping and smiling. After standing on the periphery of children, not sure of how to join them, he gives up and goes back to playing on his own. Sometimes he doesn’t know the rules of the game and can’t play when he is invited. Is this “not interested in other children?” Of course it isn’t. His inability to communicate like others, however, and in keeping up with the rapid rhythm of activity and conversation makes having friends challenging. Still, Adam has made leaps this year — wanting to join in with other children, and his increase in spoken language.

Thankfully the person evaluating Adam has recognized the limitations of these scales and the complexity of him. It is important to have your assessors understand this and urge them to observe in every setting possible. It’s important to know what lens we are assessing the autistic child through. Some of them can distort the image.

Now my back hurts from sitting at my desk too long. I’ll be back at it tomorrow, hoping to tip the scales in a fair direction.

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About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.