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Movement Disturbance — not so easy

Filed Under (Anxiety, Autism and Intelligence, Movement Disturbance, Single Parenthood, Transitions) by Estee on 19-03-2012

Adam is going through another phase and it’s time for me to be very hands-on again — new routines that may help his body and anxiety. He’s entering the pre-teen phase, and discovering things that can get him into trouble. I’ve started a running routine with Adam which helps his body calm down. Adam likes to jog (see photo). Yet like the time when we moved homes and Adam started severe spasming, he is now getting physically stuck — his body won’t let him get beyond a repeated movement. I can hear Adam start to whimper and I’m right there. Last night, it quickly became a loud cry. His face looked distressed and it took me a while to get him out of his chair.

“Are you stuck?” I asked

“Yes!” he yelled. Adam is not always able to respond when he’s experiencing this. He looked into my eyes, his body all sweaty, cheeks reddening. He let me hug him one moment, and pushed me away the next. I wanted to cry with him.

“One, two, three, four…walking out the door we go.” I sang my usual Feist tune which helps Adam move. Sometimes I hear him using it himself, which is a good sign that he can somedays. We make it to the shower where he has a “help me” look in his eye. He cried hard and I held him close. My heart breaks when he’s like this. Sometimes I get scared and I have to leave the room. I have to collect myself so I can comfort him, which I managed to do last night. Many times Adam will need to take a toy from on room in order to move on to the next thing. This he will do when he’s calmer but I realized it was a way for him to manage transitions, so I encourage it.

The distress, though — is it the new teeth punching through his gums? The lack of routine from vacation (he usually loves his vacation)? Growing pains? Another issue he cannot yet tell me about? These are some of the things we must guess as parents when communication falls apart. Sometimes he can speak in full sentences. Other days he can barely say a word. Some days he can type independently, while other days, or even moments, he will do anything to avoid typing. Adam is a neurological roller coaster ride and I’m on it with him. We can see what he is able to do and how intelligent he is, when his body permits him. When it doesn’t, Adam will become upset and frustrated. He is not in control of it. This is not behavioural.

On the weekened when he was drumming, he showed another flash of brillance — jamming in rhythm. It lasted a few seconds. Then his body took off in another direction and I had to help him focus again. Martha Leary and David Hill wrote about autism and movement disturbance and I am going to revisit it. Lorna Wing wrote about autism and catatonia. Catatonia is usally later onset — late teens, so I’m not sure if what I’m seeing with Adam is catatonia right now. In thinking about autism and movement, I remembered Amanda Bagg’s video How to Boil Water the Easy Way (and she’s wearing the Joy of Autism: Redefining Ability and Quality of Life event T-shirt). I remembered this video in order to remind myself what Adam is going through and in trying hard to relate to his experience. This is meant to be respectfully comedic. Please be patient with it and watch the entire video to really understand:

Of course, I’ve made the usual calls to investigate ways to assist Adam, and I am always in doubt. Medications are another roller coaster ride — perhaps the monster coaster that I’ve been avoiding, but I also know that I need to find ways to assist Adam with this type of pain. As for me, I often think that while I’ve assisted other people in their journey as an activist and advocate, it is in part to also help myself. I learn so much from others. I’m doing this alone in my home. Being a single parent, at night especially, has taught me that for all the times I think I can’t do it, I manage to. For all the times I think I may want to give up, I don’t. The thought of not being with Adam hurts me more. Talking it out or writing about it is helpful and for all the dark days, a good sleep and a new dawn sheds a new perspective. Adam woke up this morning with a smile on his face again, asking for bread and mustard for breakfast. There is still joy in autism and my son. He’s a fabulous human being! Yet like any parent, I have heartache when I see him in distress.

Other References:

Tony Attwood: Autism and Movement Disturbance
Martha Leary and David Hill: Moving On: Autism and Movement Disturbance
Lorna Wing: Catatonia in Autism Spectrum Disorders

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About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.