Our Monthly Flight

Filed Under (Adam, Communication) by Estee on 14-01-2011

About once a month Adam cannot sleep. It’s so regular, in fact, that I’ve come to call it our “monthly trip to Europe.” The time zone change would feel about the same.

So it was we had another one of those nights last night. It’s been a bit of a crazy week — I just returned from Costa Rica and am trying to pull myself back together. Adam also had some vacation time with me down south and then spent the rest of the time with his father. He returned to me on Monday and I was expecting him not to sleep on the first night of his return home — not the fourth.

Last night, we also played a game of I Spy. We used one of Adam’s books for this. For those of you who are not yet aware, Adam is not a fluent talker. I was quite surprised that we could play this game back and forth for about thirty minutes.

“I spy with my whittle eye something that dances,” he said in his tiny staccato voice, so soft like a whisper. While Adam has typed a few sophisticated sentences before, we’ve rarely had such interchanges, let alone ones where he’s asking me to guess the object by naming its attribute.

“Is it the ballerina?” I asked him, pointing to it.

“Ballerina, yes,” he replied.

Maybe his head was dancing for the rest of the night. Dreary eyed today, I’m still so very thrilled about the interchange.

A belated Happy New Year to everyone, by the way. I tried so hard not to blog while I was away.

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About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.