Sweet Dreams

Filed Under (Single Parenthood) by Estee on 27-11-2009

One of the most difficult things about being a single parent is letting go. Not only is it difficult for me to be without Adam some nights, but I do worry so often how he feels about missing mom or dad when he is not with us as we were. I know, many families get divorced and the children do okay. But I am not from a family of divorce and I spend most days wondering how children cope (I had four step-children as well so I was always thinking about how they were coping) and it all leaves me feeling a little melancholy. I hear that families are co-parenting successfully, whatever that really means — some “business” relationship where the couple only speaks about the children. But it’s never the same. That daily interaction where the details we took for granted are often the details that never get discussed. Maybe sometimes for some families it’s better. And for some it’s worse. And for others still, life just goes on and we make it the best we can because families, these days, seem to come in all shapes and sizes.

This song says absolutely everything about how I feel when Adam is not with me, and I do not believe that even as time smooths the hard edges of life that I will ever be used to a house with an empty bed. Thankfully, Adam has a loving family with grandparents and a mom and dad who love him so very much. So at least both mom and dad can hope that Adam will have sweet dreams because he will always know how much we love him:

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About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.