That Elusive Thing Called Happiness

Filed Under (Uncategorized) by Estee on 27-12-2008

I stumbled across my quote of the week. If you are one of my Facebook friends, you’ll notice I pick one about every week that means something to me.

“Happiness comes when your work and words are of benefit to yourself and others.” — Buddha

Happiness does not come from the outside or from others, but we all know that, right? So often we seek it from other people. I think what I most admire are the people, many who have gone through so much more than I have in this life, are those who find their contentment from within — who do not chase rainbows. Only then can we really have compassion for others in any circumstance.

In the old Joy of Autism blog (which you can download in the margin) I wrote a few times about just what happiness might be for all of us struggling either with our own views, or the barriers that confront autistic people. As I move on in my life now, employing compassion with continued intellectual debate will continue to be my goal. It is something I have tried to practice since Adam was diagnosed and since every bump and turn called life. It’s just too short to waste being angry with it. This is our real test.

Really, it is Adam who has helped me to grow in so many ways; who has brought me to so many of you from who I continue to have great interest and learn.

I know, I might be sentimental as I travel through some new challenges, but hey, it’s the end of the year.

Thank you.

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About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.