The Understated Value of Grandparents

Filed Under (Family) by Estee on 24-12-2008

This evening, Adam and I went to Grandma and Grandpa’s for our Xmas eve dinner. We celebrate both Hanukkah and Xmas in this family. After opening our presents — something that Adam never used to be interested in and now has taken interest with a vengence with any prettily wrapped package — I sat back and watched Adam and Grandpa diligently putting together a model of an ear. It took a great deal of time and patience! Grandpa and Grandma must have thought, as Adam gets a few ear infections and he is hypersensitive of his ears being touched, that taking the mystery out the ear’s anatomy might interest him. I quite think it did. Leave it to the Grandparents to come up with such a brilliant idea!

I sat quietly in the background with a great sense of peace watching them working together. You see, Grandpa is a special person in Adam’s life. Grandpa is the man who teaches Adam so many things and loves to show him new things every weekend if he can get the chance. Grandpa cooed and sang to Adam in the days when I spent hours trying to get him to sleep. I would try, then if Grandpa was around, he would offer to try and ask me to take a rest. Grandpa would cradle Adam in his arms as if he was the light of the world, swaying him and singing to him in a deep, soft voice.

Grandma, don’t be offended — you are awesome too — feeding and catering to his every whim and need and taking him on subway rides and to the museum. You are awesome. I’ve never seen a Grandmother make so much fuss over her Grandson. But you see, it’s their only Grandson, and I am their only child. This really means a lot.

Grandparents are so incredibly special and I just had to sit and watch how calm Adam is with his Grand-dad. They have a special, unbreakable bond and I thought it was a good time to embed this in my memory forever.

Grandpa and Adam

Grandpa and Adam

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About Me


ESTÉE KLAR

I’m a PhD candidate at York University, Critical Disability Studies, with a multi-disciplinary background in the arts as a curator and writer. I am the Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project (www.taaproject.com), and an enamoured mother of my only son who lives with the autism label. I like to write about our journey, critical issues regarding autism in the area of human rights, law, and social justice, as well as reflexive practices in (auto)ethnographic writing about autism.